Cell Phones

You be the Judge: Best Ultraviolet (UV) sanitizer for phones - Samsung vs. Phone Soap 3

  • Last Updated:
  • Sep 17th, 2021 2:03 pm
[OP]
Member
Jan 27, 2017
204 posts
114 upvotes

You be the Judge: Best Ultraviolet (UV) sanitizer for phones - Samsung vs. Phone Soap 3

Samsung $69.99 (sale: $48.99) (Samsung.com/ca)
https://www.samsung.com/ca/mobile-acces ... u020sacwd/
  • built-in wireless Qi charging - compatible with Samsung and Apple iPhones
  • Independently lab tested

PhoneSoap3 $79.54 Amazon.ca
https://www.amazon.ca/PhoneSoap-Sanitiz ... 948&sr=8-2
  • patented and clinically proven
  • dual universal cell phone charger
6 replies
Deal Addict
Jan 13, 2014
2339 posts
1359 upvotes
Calgary
As long as you don't mind your device smelling like ozone after taking it out of sanitizer, then go ahead and use one. I got tired of it myself and decided its a gimmick that only took hold because of the pandemic.

I'll simply continue to wash my hands frequently with soap & water.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Nov 7, 2003
20929 posts
1204 upvotes
Shanghai, China
wearysky wrote: Third alternative, don't bother with either: Yes, UV phone sanitizers work. That doesn’t mean you need one.
Devhux wrote: As long as you don't mind your device smelling like ozone after taking it out of sanitizer, then go ahead and use one. I got tired of it myself and decided its a gimmick that only took hold because of the pandemic.

I'll simply continue to wash my hands frequently with soap & water.
I'm very skeptical that it'll even work. I think a lot of these companies took advantage of the worrying public over COVID-19.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Nov 28, 2013
19986 posts
9409 upvotes
Oakville
Sgt_Strider wrote: I'm very skeptical that it'll even work. I think a lot of these companies took advantage of the worrying public over COVID-19.
It works, but it can only sanitize where the UV hits - so any crevices and the like are not going to be sanitized. But yes, they absolutely took advantage, especially in the very early pandemic when people weren't sure how Covid was transmitted - all the evidence seems to be pointing towards airborne/aerosol transmission as opposed to surface/fomite transmission though, so at least from a Covid perspective it seems unlikely that a UV sanitizer will make much difference (which is pretty much what the article I linked says)
Member
Oct 12, 2007
309 posts
121 upvotes
Vancouver
The CDC already declared surface transmissions to be a low risk, and I already knew that a year before they posted this (https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nc ... ssion.html).

Washing hands, social distancing is the way to go. Also, UV devices don't really work despite what articles say. If they did work, then we wouldn't be using surface disinfectants.

UV works, but only the industrial grade devices that hospitals use. These consumer products are too weak to provide enough power to actually be disinfecting anything, and additionally, they can be severely dangerous if they are improperly handled and you end up flashing your eyes. There is no way to tell what consumer UV products work well enough. I would just steer clear of all of them and wash your hands and don't let people intentionally cough on your phone or use your phone to wipe their hands lol.

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