Careers

You-are-not-your-Job

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  • Jul 7th, 2012 9:17 am
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[OP]
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Jul 19, 2011
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You-are-not-your-Job

You are not Your Job. Regardless if you work for a bank, if you are a cashier, if you are a window washer, if you are a stock person if you are a lawyer etc. It is the truth, and I invite you to read this article.
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Jun 20, 2010
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Thanks WildWolf. I would like to thank you on behalf of everyone on this forum for this and all of your other brilliant insights you have brought to us. Please keep up this great work and keep us ignorant masses enlightened.
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Nov 6, 2010
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Meh tbh this only matters when you're older because it's a conversation starter. When you're a kid, you're not even interested in what the other person is doing with themselves, only if they're nice and wanna play with you :lol:
Banned
Nov 27, 2006
2200 posts
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a) That girl looks ugly. Why do they put a picture of her up like that. Gross.

b) Horrid writing skills. I'd expect better from the star.

"Where you were born, the hobbies you enjoy, the problems you like solve, anything really, as long as it isn't your job"

The problems I like solve.... dur dur dur

c) Her anecdote about the trial. No really? the lawyers want people that can be impartial and can use reason and logic..... Do you really want a McDonalds LIFER cashier to be on that Jury?
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Jun 20, 2010
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Wild WOLF!!

aroooooo
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Jul 29, 2006
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my goodness...why is there such a huge picture of her? I usually only see authors post miniature-sized pictures in articles.
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Nov 15, 2010
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Irony? [QUOTE]Lisa Taylor is the President of Toronto-based Challenge Factory, the only company in Canada where you can test-drive your next career.[/QUOTE]
Member
Oct 13, 2008
347 posts
20 upvotes
Mississauga
WildWolf wrote: You are not Your Job. Regardless if you work for a bank, if you are a cashier, if you are a window washer, if you are a stock person if you are a lawyer etc. It is the truth, and I invite you to read this article.
I think that subconsciously, when meeting someone for the first time, asking anything other than "what do you do?" would (at first glance) appear to be a little to personal or inquisitive. Asking what the other person does is an ice-breaking neutral question that can lead into other ones, without creeping the other guy/girl out.
Banned
Jul 24, 2009
188 posts
8 upvotes
i agree with the author. we put too much emphasis on jobs. Work should not be what everything in your life revolves around. We need to work to live, not live to work.
[OP]
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Jul 19, 2011
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gdog799 wrote: i agree with the author. we put too much emphasis on jobs. Work should not be what everything in your life revolves around. We need to work to live, not live to work.

JK400 could learn something from that statement. Kudos !
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Jul 11, 2010
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To be honest, when you first meet a person, your first questions are: "Where did you go for school?" & "Where do you work?"
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Jan 27, 2010
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gdog799 wrote: i agree with the author. we put too much emphasis on jobs. Work should not be what everything in your life revolves around. We need to work to live, not live to work.

Why not just do both and pursue a career that you actually like? I may have taken a degree in engineering, but I sure as hell didn't do it for the money.
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Jan 5, 2006
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The question is a good ice-breaker. You spend so much of your waking hours at work, and forming work networks, that when you ask where someone works / what they do, you can usually find a common connection quickly.

That said, I don't volunteer what I do as I generally prefer to keep my professional and personal life separate.
Sr. Member
Dec 27, 2007
644 posts
4 upvotes
What you do does not dictate worth or character, but it can certainly yield insight into your personality.
Sr. Member
Jul 5, 2006
811 posts
65 upvotes
RolandCouch wrote: I'm going to have to disagree with the author. This is a great topic of conversation and opens up lots of windows when meeting people. If she is trying to say we shouldn't lump everyone from a single occupation into one bunch, OK, but it's still fun to talk about. I recently went to a party and the first two people I met were a couple that were a teacher and a banker. Given that I have a background in both, it gave us lots to talk about and relate to each other.

Yep. I'm not old enough that everyone I know is employed, so usually I just ask people what they do. Knowing people's careers does indeed give you something to talk about. If they say they're an accountant, and you're a graphics designer, you might not have a lot of work interests in common. So you can move on to "what do you do for fun?" (assuming accountants have fun). Etc. It doesn't matter if you are the world's most interesting person, random people you meet may very well not be. Careers at least give you somewhere to start with most people, so that you don't just have to talk about yourself the whole time.

Summary: That was the strangest newspaper article I've seen in a while.
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Dec 7, 2009
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gdog799 wrote: i agree with the author. we put too much emphasis on jobs. Work should not be what everything in your life revolves around. We need to work to live, not live to work.

I agree with the author as well. I never ask people, "what do you do?" because a.) It's really not important to me and b.) The last half of that inquiry is "... to make money" which when you think about it, isn't really a good ice-breaker question at all. What if that person was recently laid off, or on disability, or back in school? Now it just sets the stage for a whole barrage of awkward follow-up questions like, "Oh, and what do you plan to do after that?" which is complicated and somewhat personal.
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Dec 20, 2004
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Definitely agree with this article. I feel that people who are nothing but their job - ie it's all they are able to talk about, are about as one-dimensional and boring as it gets.

There's a big world out there and people who are completely dedicated to their careers are missing it, and I pity them.
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Sep 22, 2009
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I find it odd that so many people choose to start conversations with "what do you do for a living", when "what do you do for fun" generally leads to a much more interesting conversation and reveals far more about the person's personality. It's also much more inclusive since virtually everyone has something they enjoy doing when they have spare time, and for the most part it's something they've actively chosen to do because they like it. This makes it more likely that the person will enjoy talking about that hobby/activity; unlike when you ask about someone's job--the person may or may not have a job , and even if they do have one, there's a good chance they dislike it and/or dislike talking about it outside working hours since they talk about it for 40, 60 or 80+ hours per week depending on their line of work.

Only about 75% of adults are in the labour force, and of those only about 80-90% are likely to have a job depending on the demographics of your social gathering.

Starting with "what do you enjoy doing" is also more inclusive of students, retirees, homemakers, etc who are part of the 25% of the adult population who do not substantially participate in the labour force.
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Jun 26, 2010
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Most of the time I just keep to myself and try not to pry. I find socializing extremely tedious because people in general can be extremely sensitive. Also living in the GTA makes it worse because we've got every culture on the face of the earth represented here, and this can sometimes make socializing feel like you are tiptoeing in a minefield.

I say just stick to the hellos and cliche smalltalk lines (weather, weekend).

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