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Your road to the elusive $50k/yr. The realistic salary discussion thread.

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[OP]
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Your road to the elusive $50k/yr. The realistic salary discussion thread.

Here we have it... The realistic salary discussion thread.

Common guys... We all know it.
Most people in Canada make around this much or less. Sure there are the hot shots in certain regions with high paying jobs... But for the most part, the median family income in Canada is $76,000. If you assume just a 2 working person household, that's only $38,000/yr per person.
This doesn't include the trend of multi generational families. Its not uncommon for a household to have 2 parents working, and adult children living @ home working. This might inflate the numbers... so individual incomes could be a lot lower then we think.

So how is your road to $50k/yr going? What entry level job are you working to try and get ahead?
Did you just hit $50k/yr? What did you do to get there?


I'll say it... I work in retail banking. It was one of the few ways I could earn a living with the security of benefits, pension, and employee share ownership. I worked as a security guard and GAP sales associate prior to this. Also had a stint in Non-profit management industry. Still trying to figure life out. Still in a basement apartment, driving a 15 year old car lol.

This thread goes out to all my regular joe bro's and sisters. (no disrespect to the other rfd $100k/year champs. good for you. But you guys have 99% of the other threads in the careers section).

I'm particularly interested in... People with not much education , or less practical education.

Edit : NEW RULE. Your first job out of school or dropping out etc... must be under $39k/year. Otherwise... You're in the wrong thread. You should be in the $100k/year thread if you already make anywhere close to $50k/year out of school.. or even anything above $40k. I mean... How fun is that "Oh hi... My name is Joe... I finished shcool got a job making $49,999... Then i got a gift card at christmas so I guess i made $50k/yr right after school..."
There is no road to that. Believe it or not.. You had some luck, talent and skill to be able to do that.
Last edited by UrbanPoet on May 20th, 2016 4:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Thread Summary
LEGENDARY THREAD OF A HIGHSCHOOL GRAD MAKING OVER 60,000 - LOT TO LEARN
career-prospects-hs-graduate-help-765864/
1039 replies
Newbie
May 9, 2016
65 posts
20 upvotes
UrbanPoet wrote:
May 20th, 2016 4:29 pm
Here we have it... The realistic salary discussion thread.

Common guys... We all know it.
Most people in Canada make around this much or less. Sure there are the hot shots in certain regions with high paying jobs... But for the most part, the median family income in Canada is $76,000. If you assume just a 2 working person household, that's only $38,000/yr per person.
This doesn't include the trend of multi generational families. Its not uncommon for a household to have 2 parents working, and adult children living @ home working. This might inflate the numbers... so individual incomes could be a lot lower then we think.

So how is your road to $50k/yr going? What entry level job are you working to try and get ahead?
Did you just hit $50k/yr? What did you do to get there?


I'll say it... I work in retail banking. It was one of the few ways I could earn a living with the security of benefits, pension, and employee share ownership. I worked as a security guard and GAP sales associate prior to this. Also had a stint in Non-profit management industry. Still trying to figure life out. Still in a basement apartment, driving a 15 year old car lol.

This thread goes out to all my regular joe bro's and sisters. (no disrespect to the other rfd $100k/year champs. good for you. But you guys have 99% of the other threads in the careers section).
Past this now, but here's my path:

(1) University degree with a useless major
(2) Part time jobs: cafe, warehouse, data entry, bank teller
(3) Back to school for accounting
(4) <40k for 1 yr
(5) 45k for 1 yr
(6) >50k...
[OP]
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Jan 27, 2004
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VanIsBest wrote:
May 20th, 2016 4:41 pm
Past this now, but here's my path:

(1) University degree with a useless major
(2) Part time jobs: cafe, warehouse, data entry, bank teller
(3) Back to school for accounting
(4) <40k for 1 yr
(5) 45k for 1 yr
(6) >50k...
Gotcha. Additional education was the key for you it seems!
Deal Expert
Oct 6, 2005
16463 posts
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UrbanPoet wrote:
May 20th, 2016 4:29 pm
So how is your road to $50k/yr going? What entry level job are you working to try and get ahead?
Did you just hit $50k/yr? What did you do to get there?
Go to school, get a degree, profit.
UrbanPoet wrote:
May 20th, 2016 4:29 pm
Common guys... We all know it. Most people in Canada make around this much or less.
Your analysis isn't entirely correct because it includes students, retirees, uneducated, unemployed, unemployable, home makers, etc. If you look at median income based on age alone, median income peaks out at $54K per year. Once you also include education - assuming you have some - the numbers go up even higher - $79K with a degree.
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Aug 22, 2012
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Mark Town
Your assumption is completely wrong. A typical Canadian family has 2.2 persons. Even the adult child may live with his parents, he is likely to file his tax return separately and counted as a separate family. Most white collar workers in this country makes more than 50K.
[OP]
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coolspot wrote:
May 20th, 2016 5:02 pm
Go to school, get a degree, profit.



Your analysis isn't entirely correct because it includes students, retirees, uneducated, unemployed, unemployable, home makers, etc. If you look at median income based on age alone, median income peaks out at $54K per year. Once you also include education - assuming you have some - the numbers go up even higher - $79K with a degree.
That's a better analysis. Thank you for that.
Here you are saying, the median income peaks @ $54k/year based on age. I'm assuming you're excluding kids, student age, and seniors.
Would it be safe to say the media income is $50k based on people of a reasonable working age? e.g. exclude student age, and seniors. BUT include everyone say... between 18-65
[OP]
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sherwoodRFD wrote:
May 20th, 2016 5:11 pm
Your assumption is completely wrong. A typical Canadian family has 2.2 persons. Even the adult child may live with his parents, he is likely to file his tax return separately and counted as a separate family. Most white collar workers in this country makes more than 50K.
Most people in this country? Or most people in the GTA?
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Jul 30, 2010
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UrbanPoet wrote:
May 20th, 2016 5:27 pm
Most people in this country? Or most people in the GTA?
Wait...you mean the GTA isn't the whole country? Canada is bigger than the GTA? Someone tell Torontonians...

I have almost no post-secondary; I have high school, and eventually got through half of the CGA program (though it ended up being pointless).

1.) Started as a technician/mechanic being paid 10.50 per hour
2.) Kept moving up the chain as an aircraft engine mechanic, larger assemblies each time - 8 years total
3.) Peaked out around 19/hour there; while I was doing this I took on every redesign side project I could get involved in
4.) Moved into a document control type position, hit 45K after 4 years
5.) Relocated to Calgary in the document control world in 2013, currently earning a base of 72K with an awesome year being around 90K (with high oil prices)

Currently 33 years old, if that adds some perspective.
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Oct 6, 2005
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UrbanPoet wrote:
May 20th, 2016 5:26 pm
Would it be safe to say the media income is $50k based on people of a reasonable working age? e.g. exclude student age, and seniors. BUT include everyone say... between 18-65
But why are you comparing across the board? Someone at 18 isn't expected to make as much as someone in their prime (30 to 40):

Image

The gap is staggering - even more so between male/female.

So you have to compare yourself to people around you.
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Mar 23, 2008
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For me, it was getting a 2 year CST (Computer Systems Technology) diploma at a local college. Fresh out of that, was 30k (and this was 1997 $$$), then 6 months later got a job in the US at $35/hour US (approximately the same exchange rate as now, I believe). Came back to Canada after a year in Miami, and it's been over 50k since. From 1999 to 2009, it was a pretty steady climb from $50k to $100k, when I became a private contractor. After 3 years of that, have been at $85/hr for a few years now.

C
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Dec 9, 2013
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Toronto
I started at 50k since I first graduated from college and got my first job at 20 as a technician... Im in my mid 20's now and all my friends around my age make 50k+.
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Nov 2, 2013
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I clicked this thread expecting a certain poster to start going off about how university is the best choice... I'm repeating the obvious, but statistics are not very useful because of how skewed they are based on extrema, differing economic conditions in different places in Canada, and especially differing economic conditions based on time. The job market has changed significantly from a competitive standpoint compared to a few years to a decade ago.

University degrees are also a very broad ticket applying to a variety of occupations so it doesn't always make sense to blanket them to a certain demographic: "if you're ___ age with x credential then you on average make y". An inter-occupational analysis would be more useful for comparisons (your employer pays you on the specific job you are doing... not because you have some x credential), and even those often don't accurately reflect the applicant-to-employability ratios.

As for male/female comparisons, the statistics leave out the psychological aspects. In many cases you aren't paid less/more because of your gender. Women stereotypically associate higher positions with increased stress and worse work/life balance, and attach much higher values to dating, getting married and having kids ASAP rather than career development (i.e. they often don't chase higher incomes as much as men).

There was a good article on Bloomberg a while ago on this topic and as an illustrative example, peek on Facebook or talk to your social circles and observe that many women just spend much of their spare time daydreaming about getting men to chase them around and having babies. Same could be said about some men, and they usually are not as high on the social ladder for this reason. It's more of a mindset issue rather than strictly a gender issue; can't blame your gender or the economy in this case.

To answer the original post:

1: Landscaping labour- about mid $5000s/month income, but a seasonal job, though off-season then you would receive EI for about $2188/month.
2: Oilfield labour- $52000/month, though at the time for the industry this was very low.
3: Oilfield Well Servicing- variable, but roughly $70-80K/year.
4: Construction labour- mid $5000s/month
5: Construction trucking and road construction- $8000-10000/month for 5-6 months, then EI off-season.
6: Apprentice electrician- goes up yearly, but 1st year rate is $18-22/hour, hours depends on how busy.
7: Oilfield services and trucking- variable, but current rate is $91.8K for 6 months/year, remainder is around $300-400/day depending on how busy it is. Typical industry income is $100-150K/year in a good economy.
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Sep 7, 2004
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Out of university I started off pulling in $35k doing customer service type work. I moved out from that pretty quickly and started doing clerical/administrative jobs that bumped me up to $40k and then $45k within 2 years. Then I got a new role as a business analyst hitting $55k. All in it took me about 5 years after university to hit slightly above the median. I had hoped that my progress would have been faster but I graduated right smack dab in the middle of the recession and jobs/promo's were very hard to come by.

An interesting calculator that a data scientist put together back in 2013 compares people in your specific demographic. The calculator uses your gender, age group, your education, and your ethnicity and the data is pulled from the 2011 National Housing Survey from stats Can so you'll have to expect a few percentage points for inflation but it gives you a better view of how you stack up against people in your "specific" groupings.

http://www.chadskelton.com/p/services.html <-- Look for "income calculator".
[OP]
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Jan 27, 2004
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Hm... I didn't think about this... But I think the responses here might be skewed too. Since its not that anonymous. No one is going to come in and post "YO... I'm working @ the factory right now for 5 years. I'm a supervisor now, but I don't make much. I'm working on my part time degree to try and get outta here."

But if you PM me your story... I'll post it anonymously!
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Nov 8, 2013
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FirstGear wrote:
May 20th, 2016 6:38 pm
I clicked this thread expecting a certain poster to start going off about how university is the best choice... I'm repeating the obvious, but statistics are not very useful because of how skewed they are based on extrema, differing economic conditions in different places in Canada, and especially differing economic conditions based on time. The job market has changed significantly from a competitive standpoint compared to a few years to a decade ago.

University degrees are also a very broad ticket applying to a variety of occupations so it doesn't always make sense to blanket them to a certain demographic: "if you're ___ age with x credential then you on average make y". An inter-occupational analysis would be more useful for comparisons (your employer pays you on the specific job you are doing... not because you have some x credential), and even those often don't accurately reflect the applicant-to-employability ratios.

As for male/female comparisons, the statistics leave out the psychological aspects. In many cases you aren't paid less/more because of your gender. Women stereotypically associate higher positions with increased stress and worse work/life balance, and attach much higher values to dating, getting married and having kids ASAP rather than career development (i.e. they often don't chase higher incomes as much as men).

There was a good article on Bloomberg a while ago on this topic and as an illustrative example, peek on Facebook or talk to your social circles and observe that many women just spend much of their spare time daydreaming about getting men to chase them around and having babies. Same could be said about some men, and they usually are not as high on the social ladder for this reason. It's more of a mindset issue rather than strictly a gender issue; can't blame your gender or the economy in this case.

To answer the original post:

1: Landscaping labour- about mid $5000s/month income, but a seasonal job, though off-season then you would receive EI for about $2188/month.
2: Oilfield labour- $52000/month, though at the time for the industry this was very low.
3: Oilfield Well Servicing- variable, but roughly $70-80K/year.
4: Construction labour- mid $5000s/month
5: Construction trucking and road construction- $8000-10000/month for 5-6 months, then EI off-season.
6: Apprentice electrician- goes up yearly, but 1st year rate is $18-22/hour, hours depends on how busy.
7: Oilfield services and trucking- variable, but current rate is $91.8K for 6 months/year, remainder is around $300-400/day depending on how busy it is. Typical industry income is $100-150K/year in a good economy.
Why are they paying truckers 100k+ when they pay truckers next to minimum wage in Ontario? I must be missing something; I assume it isn't simply just Joe Blow or Sanjay from India off the street.

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