Computers & Electronics

Z5500 broken - is my fuse blown?

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  • Jan 6th, 2021 3:07 pm
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[OP]
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Oct 12, 2007
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Vancouver

Z5500 broken - is my fuse blown?

Hi,

My Z5500 stopped working, mainly the control pod won't turn on anymore, and I can't find any alternatives to replace to control pod, but I'm just ruling out that the fuse isn't the issue.

It looks like it's not blown, but looking closer, it seems like a bit of the coil in the middle is missing. I thought blown fuses are pretty obvious, but is this fuse blown?
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16 replies
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Oct 8, 2006
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easy way to check is just bridge the points where the fuse was and see if it works.

Other way is to test the fuse via a multimeter or led or something.

Looks okay to me though based on the picture.
[OP]
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Oct 12, 2007
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Vancouver
killoverme wrote: easy way to check is just bridge the points where the fuse was and see if it works.

Other way is to test the fuse via a multimeter or led or something.

Looks okay to me though based on the picture.
I'm not really sure how bridge it in the Z5500 fuse slot. Do I just put something conductive there?

I guess I might have to go to the multimeter route. Not sure if I have one handy.

I'm just hoping it's the fuse or my $400 speakers are worthless now.
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Yes just a piece of metal that can touch both points. I would only do it for a few seconds though, just to see if it turns on.

Fuses do blow for a reason. Hopefully it was just a random spike of amperage... Can't tell if that's a fast or slow trigger fuse... So technically using it without a fuse can be more problematic if there is an actual problem with your speakers.
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That's a slow blow fuse, looks blown. It should be a continuous spiral of metal.

Check this out: https://www.youtube.com/watch/qgz1lskyYDU

Get a multi meter and do a continuity test to verify, or rig the fuse in line with fresh batteries in simple circuit (battery operated anything - lights, toy etc)
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Apr 29, 2018
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Doesn't look blown to me. Normally there are some indicators of a burn, in those cases. Like soot or a clean visible break. Best to test with a multimeter, or simple circuit as suggested above ^
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[OP]
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Oct 12, 2007
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Vancouver
kramer1 wrote: Doesn't look blown to me. Normally there are some indicators of a burn, in those cases. Like soot or a clean visible break. Best to test with a multimeter, or simple circuit as suggested above ^
It was protected by a surge protector, unfortunately, I didn't plug it into my UPS battery protection.

A power sag seemed to have done it, so it wasn't some huge spike. I gotta check with a multimeter.
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Jan 21, 2018
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Yes, it's blown - the gap in the coil makes it obvious. There doesn't have to be any kind of burn mark. The way to be sure is to test it for continuity with a multimeter. If you don't have a multimeter... why not?? They're cheap, easy to use, and essential for everything electrical.

You could bridge the fuse holder contacts with a bit of wire to test, but pay attention to what @killoverme said: fuses blow for a reason. They are there to protect your device. A slow-blow fuse likely isn't going to blow from a momentary power peak because you were playing the speakers too loud. It would be more likely to blow because an output transistor in the amp shorted, a common failure mode for audio amps. In that case bridging the fuse contacts will simply cause more damage. And any new fuse you put in there will quickly blow too. But you mentioned something about a power sag? That could cause it as well. It's worth sacrificing a new fuse to find out. Check the capacity and size of the current fuse, and get a new one to match.

If the new fuse blows immediately, something in your amp is toast, and you have to decide whether it might be worth the cost of repair or not. This type of repair is usually about 30 minutes work and a couple of dollars worth of parts for an expert, but you're not likely to get it done for under $200.

A surge protector probably wouldn't have helped. Most of the cheap surge protectors only protect against brief high-voltage spikes. A UPS might have helped though, if it acted fast enough.
[OP]
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Oct 12, 2007
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Vancouver
Scote64 wrote: Yes, it's blown - the gap in the coil makes it obvious. There doesn't have to be any kind of burn mark. The way to be sure is to test it for continuity with a multimeter. If you don't have a multimeter... why not?? They're cheap, easy to use, and essential for everything electrical.

You could bridge the fuse holder contacts with a bit of wire to test, but pay attention to what @killoverme said: fuses blow for a reason. They are there to protect your device. A slow-blow fuse likely isn't going to blow from a momentary power peak because you were playing the speakers too loud. It would be more likely to blow because an output transistor in the amp shorted, a common failure mode for audio amps. In that case bridging the fuse contacts will simply cause more damage. And any new fuse you put in there will quickly blow too. But you mentioned something about a power sag? That could cause it as well. It's worth sacrificing a new fuse to find out. Check the capacity and size of the current fuse, and get a new one to match.

If the new fuse blows immediately, something in your amp is toast, and you have to decide whether it might be worth the cost of repair or not. This type of repair is usually about 30 minutes work and a couple of dollars worth of parts for an expert, but you're not likely to get it done for under $200.

A surge protector probably wouldn't have helped. Most of the cheap surge protectors only protect against brief high-voltage spikes. A UPS might have helped though, if it acted fast enough.
Oh thanks for the advice. There is a multimeter in the house, but I gotta ask for it.

Yeah I plugged it into the surge protector side of the UPS rather than the backup battery. Didn't know that it would have died. I was having really bad electrical issues at that time, so it shouldn't be the amp. I'll just get the 2A 250 time delay fuse from somewhere.
Not sure where in Vancouver I can get it because it seems like all the bigger shops, Radio Shack, Walmart, The Source, all stopped carrying it in their store.
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Whoaness wrote: Not sure where in Vancouver I can get it because it seems like all the bigger shops, Radio Shack, Walmart, The Source, all stopped carrying it in their store.
I hear you! Try Canadian Tire.

You might want to go on AliExpress and order a giant set of fuses for cheap. Good for the future even if it takes several months to arrive.
https://www.aliexpress.com/wholesale?ca ... Text=fuses
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aaron158 wrote: the z5500s use a 2A slow blow fuse. u use to be able to buy them at radio shack for a couple bucks.

https://www.ebay.ca/itm/Ferraz-Shawmut- ... SwAolah8GY i believe these are the ones ud want here if u have a tv repair shop near by try there they will probably have tons of them.
Your link seems to be 0.5A not 2A

In Toronto we have a couple of surplus / electronic stores. I'm sure you have a few in Vancouver.
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Main Street east side just south of 25th ued to be the place but now one is gone and the other, Lee's Electronics, is on Fraser St..
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[OP]
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Oct 12, 2007
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thriftshopper wrote: Main Street east side just south of 25th ued to be the place but now one is gone and the other, Lee's Electronics, is on Fraser St..
Thanks! Yeah I remember that was the place I got some weird random electronic part before. I called and they have it.

Going there when I can.
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Figure out why you have a blown fuse, or you will most likely have two blown fuses ;)
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[OP]
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Oct 12, 2007
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Vancouver
Thanks everyone. It was the fuse. Replacing it worked. Bought a 2A 250v slow blow fuse (and a 4A one just in case since the speakers specify it on a label) from Lee's Electronics in Vancouver. Apparently the only electronic parts store in Vancouver, so I had to wait an hour long to get in since covid restrictions lol. Worth it.
IcarusLSC wrote: Figure out why you have a blown fuse, or you will most likely have two blown fuses ;)
Yeah my house had extreme electrical issues. BC Hydro came to replace wires and it seems to be gone. Regardless, my speakers are going to be plugged into my UPS from now on.

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